Gluten Free and Stuttering

Can a gluten-free diet help with stuttering? There is some evidence that perhaps it might.

According to the case records of the Massachusetts General Hospital, a middle-aged patient, after being diagnosed with CD (Celiac Disease), was found to have his speech abilities return after having been diagnosed with aphasia after a period of several months.

After all, it would make sense that eliminating gluten could help with neurological problems such as speech difficulty. Gluten sensitivity or celiac disease has been found in the majority of patients troubled by a neurological disease without a known origin. Furthermore, gluten-sensitive people who don’t have celiac disease outnumbers 2:1 the number of celiac patients. This means that even if someone tests negative for celiac disease that they may have a gluten sensitivity.

In conclusion, it would be worth your time to get tested for celiac disease if you have a neurologically-based stuttering problem of unexplained origin, and if the results are negative, you may want to try a gluten-free diet. Check with your doctor before making any such changes to your diet.

Let me know if you find it helps!

Tina Turbin

http://www.GlutenFreeHelp.info

From our home to yours, Miranda Jade.


About Us

I'm a cookbook-collecting, recipe-developing paleo junkie, and I live in the kitchen. I'm hooked on farmers' markets, traveling, eating healthy, and hiking until my legs scream at me. There's nothing better than hanging out with family and good friends. I have fun and sleeping is just plain boring. Read more About Tina Turbin.


7 thoughts on “Gluten Free and Stuttering

  1. Hello, I totally believe that with eliminating the gluten the stuttering could diminish. ( as well as other illnesses ) When I was diagnosed with Sjogrens Disease, my cheeks were always red as well as rashes on my lower legs all the time. My rheumatologist referred me to a dermatologist as he said I also have Roseasia but I didn’t believe I did that it was a symptom of the Sjogrens and I was dertermined to figure it out. I didn’t have to as after a couple months my pharmacist then asked me questions and told me to go gluten free that that is the culprit in most if not all my symptoms. How right he was ! Rashes on cheeks and legs dissappeared within a couple weeks. AND I truly believe that 98% of all Rosaesia people should quit any meds and go gluten free. When I told my doc I stopped the plaquenil and went gluten free ( not 100% yet ) all he said was good. I still see him twice a year but nothing changes. It appeared as if he knew about gluten and Sjogrens but he didn’t say so just agreed with me that I was on the right track. I ask myself … how long has it been that companys have added so much chemicals to foods to either preserve it longer or make it taste better or make it more cravable…. it will never stop and people will most likely depend on thier doctors & pharmacys instead of doing the research. Very sad. Another very sad moment was when just a few days ago I was in the grocery store and saw a young woman with bright red cheeks and forehead and I asked her about it she said it was Roseasia and the stuff she’s been using on it per her doc was not helping. I told her I had the same thing but instead went gluten free per my pharmacist and all she said was ‘ I can’t afford that ‘. Hummmmm, that seems to be the responce I hear. God bless you for your work here with gluten information. I truly appreciate it…. Teresa

  2. Wow it’s so crazy what sorts of things food allergies or intolerances or whatever can cause in a person! I’m not a stutterer, but if I was, I can’t even imagine how I would ever even think that gluten would be the source of it! When stuttering seems like a psychological problem…But I’ve heard of people’s depression and anxiety getting much better when they’re gluten free so I could really see that this could be true. Thanks so much for this really interesting post!

  3. Hi Tina I haven’t heard of this either, but it really makes you think how many of those mental disorders out there are food-caused! I remember I used to get feelings of anxiety from eating soy and wheat. I thought I was going a little crazy! Then I cut these out because I found out I was sensitive to them, and now I feel great!

  4. @Monica K I think this is more like a neurological issue, but I agree it is very surprising to hear about the conditions that celiac disease can aggravate or even cause. There are all sorts of neurological problems gluten can cause such as headaches, carpal tunnel (!), and even epilepsy (!!). It’s pretty amazing. I think so many more people are sensitive to gluten than we are estimating. Just imagine how many of the conditions we suffer from in America may be caused by just food allergies or sensitivities! It boggles the mind!

  5. Hi Tina I’m a new reader of your blog and I just wanted to say I’m very impressed with what I’ve seen! The recipes sound great, the reviews are of companies I’m not familiar with so I can expand my gluten free horizons, and then you posted this amazing blog on the connection between gluten and stuttering, which is something I’ve just NEVER heard of. After being celiac for 12 years you get to the point where you think you know everything and it’s hard to find blogs that can teach me something new, but your blog has certainly gone beyond my expectations!

  6. This sounds a bit like anecdotal evidence to me, but you never know. I find that each person is different in how they’re affected by celiac disease. It’s an interesting disease like that. So maybe just a small percentage of celiacs could have a stuttering problem, but what does it matter if they have an answer for their problem now (the gluten-free diet)?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *