Celiac Disease Research Needs Support

     Why is it that you and your doctors probably haven’t heard about celiac disease? Although the amount of research on celiac disease is growing, it depends entirely on the generosity of benefactors for its funding. Without these charitable donations, there would be no way to continue this research and the efforts to raise awareness. Out of the estimated fifty autoimmune diseases that have been discovered by doctors, it is the only one for which research isn’t supported by the U.S. government.

      Despite the lack of funding, thanks to the hard work of celiac disease advocates, there has been some progress made in the fight to raise awareness. In 2003, an unofficial group of celiac community leaders came together to help persuade Congress to pass a law which would require food labels to include information about allergens. The Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act was signed into law on August 3, 2004, greatly helping those who suffer from celiac disease or who are gluten-sensitive to shop for gluten-free groceries. When this was achieved, the need for a permanently established advocacy organization was seen, and this advocacy group became the American Celiac Disease Alliance (ACDA), which continues to this day to represent the celiac community to Congress.

Tina Turbin

From our home to yours, Miranda Jade.


About Us

I'm a cookbook-collecting, recipe-developing paleo junkie, and I live in the kitchen. I'm hooked on farmers' markets, traveling, eating healthy, and hiking until my legs scream at me. There's nothing better than hanging out with family and good friends. I have fun and sleeping is just plain boring. Read more About Tina Turbin.


5 thoughts on “Celiac Disease Research Needs Support

  1. You are 100% right. With the incidence of celiac disease RISING, we need more research so we can prevent people from developing it in the first place!

  2. We definitely need to do something about this tina you’re absolutely right. I had never heard of celiac disease or even gluten until last year when I got tested for gluten sensitivity. My test came out negative, but I stopped eating gluten anyway, and already my rheumatoid arthritis is so much better as well as some other symptoms. How can people get tested for something they and their doctors have never even heard of?

  3. I think we’ve really come along way, but with so many interesting things in development with probiotics and enzymes, we need more research! I agree with Gillian about the need for an understanding of what’s causing celiac disease to rise. I bet it has to do with the way grains are processed. Just a theory. XOXO Naomi

  4. I am so glad to find not only incredible recipes and tips on your website but efforts to raise awareness as well! I have a good feeling about the future with the internet here. I’ve never seen so much recognition since over the last three to five years.

  5. We all need to pitch and do our parts, telling friends, family, associates, etc., sending out links to everyone we know, wearing gluten free teeshirts, throwing gluten free events, etc.! Word of mouth can be VERY powerful!

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